“But enough . . . skiddaw come” (MS II; MS V)—In his version, “Skiddaw”, based on the MS II draft, Collingwood omits this transition, “But enough / Ive treated of the clouds”; instead, he retains the end of the original line, but changes the verb tense—from “skiddaw come” to “Skiddaw came”—and runs this phrase into Ruskinʼs following line, “noble and grand and beutious clothed with green”.


“Play . . . arretez” (MS II)—This fragment of text may be a metamark, a commentary on the act of composition itself rather than forming a part of the poem (see Editorial and Encoding Rationale and Methodology: Element, Attribute, and Value Usage—Metamarks); alternatively, the text possibly represents Ruskinʼs first thoughts about another work, “Battle of Waterloo, A Play, in Two Acts. The deleted line does not appear in the play as fair‐copied, but one can imagine it spoken by one of the French characters. The fair copy of the play appears along with the fair copy of the poem, “On Skiddaw and Derwent Water”, in the handmade pamphlet, “Battle of Waterloo, A Play, in Two Acts, with Other Small Poems, Dedicated to His Father”. See “On Skiddaw and Derwent Water”: Composition and Publication.


“those giant works of art” (MS V; Poems [1891])—In the fair copy version, in the manuscript, “Battle of Waterloo, A Play, in Two Acts, with Other Small Poems, Dedicated to His Father”, Ruskin glosses the “giant works of art” with a footnote, identifying them as “The Pyramids”.


“but no more . . . happy day” (MS II; MS V)—In his version, “Skiddaw”, based on the MS II draft, Collingwood omits Ruskinʼs reference to his fatherʼs birthday, “but no more . . . / on this sad subject on this happy day”. The omission is in keeping with the policy that, as Collingwood remarks concerning another birthday ode, “Birthday Addresses usually need lopping to be presentable as ‘poems’” (Poems [4o, 1891], 1:269; Poems [8o, 1891], 1:270).


“Hollo papa . . . you” and text of sermon notes on “christs intercession” (MS II)—Again, fragments of other works intervene in Ruskinʼs composition of the poem. First, what appears to be the salutation of a letter to his father closely resembles the beginning of a 13 February 1829 letter in Burd, ed., Ruskin Family Letters, 174. This fragment is followed by the text of brief notes on a sermon, Sermon Notes [“christs intercession”].